Why the Bible? Why Christianity?

This is Ravi Zacharias on why Christianity is the true religion.  And what make Christianity and the Bible unique over all the other world religions.

And these are some of the same things I have said to people on why they should believe Christianity over any other God or Religion.

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About M. Rodriguez

When I first received Christ salvation, I made it a priority to read the whole bible and I did. But it was the Bible that made me question my faith. For I found it flawed and lacking. Due to this I launched a personal inquiry/investigation into my faith, and ultimately realized that the Christian God of the Bible was indeed man-made. Now I Blog about those findings and life after Christ.
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15 Responses to Why the Bible? Why Christianity?

  1. His example of the historical prophecies of Daniel are unsubstantiated. The claim that Daniel was written 500 years before Christ is not firm. Even the Jews did not include it in their canon till after the time of Christ.

    As for Zechariah 12….I think this is an example of Christians cherry picking prophecies. The chapter is about Israel, it is not clear that the phrase “the one they have pierced” is about a crucified messiah. It doesn’t really seem to fit the chapter as a whole.

    Ravi is a gifted orator, but he essentially is making assertions without evidence. At least in this clip…

  2. Brenda says:

    I’ll put my response in the form of some questions. My questions apply to any holy book, but obviously we’re focusing on the Bible.

    1) If the Bible is divinely inspired, why has it not managed to convince the majority of mankind that it is anything more than a book written by people?

    2) Christians believe that people of other faiths have been duped into thinking their holy books are from God when they are not. Can they admit then that this indicates that it is easy for people to be completely wrong on this issue and therefore it is very possible that the Christians could also be wrong about their own holy book?

    3) If it’s divinely inspired, why does so much of it have to be explained away? (ex. slavery, sexism, genocide, scientific knowledge that is indicative only of the time period it was written in, etc.)

    4) If an outsider were to ask most Christians if they extensively researched the holy books of other religions before deciding that the Bible was the only divinely inspired holy book, what would their response be?

    5) If the Bible is divinely inspired, shouldn’t we expect more than vague prophecies that could be interpreted in numerous ways as having been fulfilled? If a book is from God, shouldn’t the prophecies be specific so that no one could doubt that what had been prophesied had come to pass exactly as stated? (Why do prophecies not tell us the names of the countries or people and the specific time and place something will happen?)

    6) If the Bible is divinely inspired, why does it fail to communicate a clear message to mankind or even to its own followers? If it’s divinely inspired, why can’t Christians agree on what it says on even the most basic issues (obvious by the countless numbers of different denominations)?

    • Hey Brenda,

      Thanks for your feedback.

      I’m not going to respond to your questions, cause I no longer believe the bible to be errant anymore. However I think you still do present valid questions. Especially on the bible being divinly inpired…

      In regards to the topic of the bible, I have asked both Nate and UnkleE to both do a contribution post on the issue of biblical inerrancy and how and what it means to the christian. I will be collaborating with them on that.

      I have set the paratmeters for the article yet, I think though I will include the issue of being divinely inpired in it.

      • Brenda says:

        I don’t think the questions depend on someone believing the bible is inerrant. I think they apply as long as someone thinks that the bible contains a message from God.

    • ignorantianescia says:

      Hello Brenda,

      Since you obviously put quite some time into these questions, I’ll respond to them. My responses will in most cases be brief, so if I come across as curt then I’ll apologies for that.

      1) If the Bible is divinely inspired, why has it not managed to convince the majority of mankind that it is anything more than a book written by people?

      Divine inspiration is about the origin of Scripture, it does not mean that it has the magic property to convince everybody who reads it.

      2) Christians believe that people of other faiths have been duped into thinking their holy books are from God when they are not. Can they admit then that this indicates that it is easy for people to be completely wrong on this issue and therefore it is very possible that the Christians could also be wrong about their own holy book?

      Yes, it is possible that Christians are wrong. Though most faiths in the world do not have Holy Books so it is irrelevant for most religions, but the adherents of the ones that do ave Holy Books form a majority. In any case, whether Islam is a divine revelation is a point debated among Christians (I tend towards it isn’t) and it is difficult for Christians to claim that the Hebrew Bible is uninspired.

      3) If it’s divinely inspired, why does so much of it have to be explained away? (ex. slavery, sexism, genocide, scientific knowledge that is indicative only of the time period it was written in, etc.)

      Because divine inspiration does not mean that every portion of text contains supreme scientific or moral knowledge. Scripture has to be read in its own context and in the context of its time. When that is done, I think it is fair to say that it has contributed both to moral as scientific progress. Aside that, many of

      4) If an outsider were to ask most Christians if they extensively researched the holy books of other religions before deciding that the Bible was the only divinely inspired holy book, what would their response be?

      I would say I didn’t. But either two alleged revelations are incompatible, with one or both being (an) invalid revelation(s), or they are compatible, with both being valid revelations. If one is considered to be probably a revelation, then another alleged revelation is either not true or it is indifferent whether one adheres to it or not.

      5) If the Bible is divinely inspired, shouldn’t we expect more than vague prophecies that could be interpreted in numerous ways as having been fulfilled? If a book is from God, shouldn’t the prophecies be specific so that no one could doubt that what had been prophesied had come to pass exactly as stated? (Why do prophecies not tell us the names of the countries or people and the specific time and place something will happen?)

      No, divine inspiration

      6) If the Bible is divinely inspired, why does it fail to communicate a clear message to mankind or even to its own followers? If it’s divinely inspired, why can’t Christians agree on what it says on even the most basic issues (obvious by the countless numbers of different denominations)?

      First of all, not all denominations take Scripture to be the sole authority. Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Roman Catholic Christian regard tradition as authoritative as well. So that will immediately lead to different stances on various issues. Those Christians (a majority of Christians) could rationally disagree that it would have to communicate a clear message (and some do). I do not see why it would be a problem for them at all.

      Then, on many issues Christians who believe that the Bible is authoritative and adhere to a similar approach to the Bible will agree. However for those Christians the difference between exegesis and eisegesis becomes important. That means it is important to read the Bible in its own context and to critically test one’s preconceived notions about it. It is impossible for us to eliminate all our biases, but if many people continuously cooperate it should be possible to approximate the meaning of the text.

      Now many of the disagreements between these denominations come down to attitude towards Scripture. And many other differences result from texts that are actually quite difficult so they are not basic issues. That’s why the Reformers taught that the Bible was sufficiently clear, but not entirely clear on every issue. I think there are plenty of “battlegrounds” in theology that are quite obscure.

      I hope this reply is of use to you and have a nice weekend.

      • ignorantianescia says:

        Oops, my reply too point 5 is very unfinished.

        5) If the Bible is divinely inspired, shouldn’t we expect more than vague prophecies that could be interpreted in numerous ways as having been fulfilled? If a book is from God, shouldn’t the prophecies be specific so that no one could doubt that what had been prophesied had come to pass exactly as stated? (Why do prophecies not tell us the names of the countries or people and the specific time and place something will happen?)

        No, divine inspiration doesn’t require prophecies relevant to our time as evidence. If Jesus has been resurrected, then that is sufficient evidence.

  3. portal001 says:

    “I no longer believe the bible to be errant anymore.”

    did you mean to write inerrant or errant?

    • yeah I probably should have been more clear in what I mean. I believe the current Bible in the current form we have is errant. Now the question of the auto-biographical original text being inerrant of being God-breathed and inerrant, I will address in later post.

      • Brenda says:

        I’ll be interested to see that discussion because I’m wondering what God’s purpose would be in making an original text inerrant or god-breathed but then allowing people to mess it up. What good is an inerrant original text if no one has access to it? If its message is so important, wouldn’t God have made preserving it a priority? But I’ll leave that for your future post.

    • to brenda,

      me too, I set a target date for the two articles by Nate and UnkleE for May 11th, but it could take them a lil longer depending on how extensive the articles they write.

  4. Brenda-

    You said
    “What good is an inerrant original text if no one has access to it? ”
    That is the million dollar question….unless I can find an answer to this question, I can no longer put my faith in the Bible as the word of God.

  5. portal001 says:

    this is more related to testimony, but I have a question to anybody who has a faith in Christ

    Have you ever had a direct experience of God?

    Can you please explain what happended?

    Are there particular experiences of God communicating with you that stick in your mind?

    Biblically speaking, is our relationship with Christ meant to be a personal relationship?

    How does this look like?

    what is this relationship?

    How can I have a relationship with someone I can’t see, that I have never heard, and from memory who has not directly responded to me like a friend or family member or a stranger might respond to me?

    If draw a relationship from answered prayers,even then this is very different from the way I interact with everyone else in my life.

    What a strange relationship, is this a relationship?

    Here’s a analogy:

    I’m talking to my friend Frank in the living room. Although I can’t see Frank, and Frank has never responded to me the way other people I can see have responded to me.

    Everything I know about Frank I have heard from other people, but not from Frank verbally. If I was given a book about Frank, although through this book I might feel like I know Frank, or can relate to him, isin’t this very different from being able to actually converse with Frank.

    If someone asked me how I knew Frank was in the room what would be my response? was Frank a very, very patient listener. Or was Frank not there? which is more likely?

    what relationship is there to indicate that Frank exists?

    has anyone had a direct experience of God?

  6. portal001 says:

    But how do we explain music? beauty? the created order? dreams? self awareness? the ability to even contemplate?

    Could it be that Im just not listening carefully enough for God? or I’m afraid of what I might be told? or Im too distracted?

    I want a personal relationship with God, but Im unsettled at the same time with the idea if God directly communicated with me.

    If you read in the Bible, with great revelation came great responsability. God used those people he directly communicated with.

    Is this the difference between believing and knowing?

    Im caught between wanting to have personal relationship, and being scared of what that might mean.

  7. Pingback: Top Christian Apologist | The BitterSweet End

  8. Noel says:

    Portal001, I just came across this comment from last year, and was touched by it. I feel the same way. I left the church about two years ago, and I have evolved into a more inclusive way of living spirituality. What I can tell you is that, while I practiced fundamentalism and reading the Bible one night, I did experience an unexplainable phenomena. I felt as if there was actually someone there with me, but I could not see or hear it. I fell to my knees and started crying like a baby. I have also seen people during church events being prayed on and having violent compulsions, as in exorcism. But I have never concluded that these were actual spiritual events or simply psychological behaviors. I have spoken in tongues before, but I believe I was conditioned to do so in an environment where it was widely practiced and reinforced. I still believe that the Bible is divinely inspired, but not necessarily without flaws, since it has been rewritten and interpreted in so many different ways. I am a work in progress, in other words.

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